Garden diary

Broader horizons

 

Over the last few weeks the garden has turned a fresh, lush green. The last of the beech topiary has finally come into leaf and the garden feels complete and ready for summer. Late May is one of the highlights of the gardening year for me when sunny, warm days still have the novelty of spring and strong new growth on every plant has yet to become a chore to control. It's the seasonal variety that partly defines the English garden and the next four or five weeks leading up to the summer solstice is the most satisfying time to be a gardener.

The garden however now begins to suck you into a co-dependent and exclusive relationship. It's a relationship that is rewarding and pleasurable but can also be a little obsessive and oppressive. As the garden grows and blooms the work it demands builds to a crescendo, which won't tail off until mid July. In the mean time the work is frantic.

The trouble with this is that while the garden you work in is consuming your every waking minute (and often sleeping thoughts too), other gardens are also looking at their most lush and florific. In the past I have often missed this most magical time in other gardens because my thoughts are too tied up in my own to even consider visiting them. This year however I am determined to change all of that.

Britain is full of fantastic gardens and as a nation we do seem to be rather preoccupied with this lush green island of ours. Whilst many of our most important and historic gardens are in the safe hands of the National Trust, many are not. Like the great houses of Britain some of the most important have been preserved but many are still in private hands and some lesser houses, no less historic, at least on a local level, are in the caring hands of their owners. Over the years it is this latter group that I have found often to be the more interesting. Gardens that are opened through organisations like the HHA (Historic Houses Association) and importantly the NGS (National Gardens Scheme) offer us the opportunity to visit places that are free from the guiding hands of an expert committee and as such have found their own special character.

So I have set myself the goal of seeing as many of these places as I can this summer; to explore the great and the small, the monumental and the residential, in order to broaden my own horizons, meet other gardening enthusiasts but mostly to break free from the exclusive relationship I have with Allt-y-bela. The result, I hope, will be a freshness gained from other garden styles, plant choices and landscapes that will in turn enhance my own understanding and appreciation for the garden I work in.

Over the past few weeks I have visited Sir Roy Strong's garden at The Laskett, a beautiful arts and crafts garden called Perrycroft near Malvern and Buscot Park in Oxfordshire which is a National Trust garden with a twist; the family still live on site and are clearly still very much involved in the evolution of it.

I really can't recommend visiting gardens enough, there is always something to admire and to be learned and meeting with gardeners and garden creators is always incredibly inspiring. The NGS even have a mobile App these days, which is a great way to discover gardens to visit near you. I'm not sure where I'll be heading this weekend; I might even see you there, wherever it is I'm looking forward to discovering something new and reveling in this country's garden culture. 

Words: Steve Lannin, Head Gardener at Allt-y-bela

Photos of Buscot Park: Britt Willoughby Dyer

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